The ressources

In this space, the IAOC publishes resources of its various activities, whether planned, in progress or nearing completion. These files are primarily published in PDF format for easier downloading.

THE LATEST FILES PUBLISHED

Thursday 27 August 2015
- Research and Development direction
The production of coffee in Angola was started in the 1830s by the Portuguese colonial power. It later became an important cash crop of the country being grown on approximately 596,000 hectares comprising 2,500 commercial farms/plantations owned mostly by the Portuguese and 250,000 peasant holdings of small scale coffee farms1,2,7. In the 1960s (1963/64 – 1968/69) and early 1970s (1970/71 – 1975/76), Angola was one of the largest African coffee producers and exporters ranking second after Cote d’Ivoire and even ranking first in some of the years. During those days, coffee was one of the largest agricultural products and major sources of foreign exchange earners for the country.
Thursday 27 August 2015
- Research and Development direction
1.1 The Democratic Republic of Congo (D.R.C) is a country endowed with diversity of natural resources including coffee. It is one of the centers of origins and diversity for C. Canephora species, commonly known in the coffee trade as Robusta coffee. The country also produces Arabica coffee in the Eastern parts of the country mainly in the provinces of Oriental, North-Kivu, South-Kivu, and Katanga (north-eastern part) bordering Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania. Robusta grows in almost all provinces of the country except Katanga with varying degrees of abundance, being Equateur, Orientale, Bandundu, and Bas-Congo provinces the major producers. Kadai-Occidental, Kasi-Orintal, Katanga and Maniema provinces are very minor Robusta coffee producers but central in mineral resources.
Thursday 27 August 2015
- Research and Development direction
Cameroon was once reportedly the second leading coffee producer and exporter in Africa with annual production of as high as 132,000 tons in 1986. Since then, the production has been steadily declining with swinging annual production that went down as low as 36, 000 tons in 2010. According to ICO statistics, the production over the last 12 years (2000 – 2011) ranged between 66,780 in 2000 and 36,480 in 2010 with an annual average of 49,505 tons indicating a trend of stagnation. The productivity is also very low, about 204 kg/ha for Arabica and 340 kg/ha for Robusta according to early reports. However, data collected from the farmers and divisional ministry of Agriculture Office shows lower figures, 100 kg/ha for Arabica and 300 kg/ha for Robusta. According to earlier reports (Amadou, 2007), not only annual production but the cultivated area has also declined. On the average, the cultivated coffee area was about 280,606 ha between 1969 – and 1973 but this has dwindled to 187,119 ha between 1999 and 2003. It appeared that Cameroon had encountered similar problem that experienced in most of the African coffee producing countries that resulted in dramatic reduction of African export share in the world market. Africa’s global export share was about 30% in the 1970s and 80s but it is only between 11 – 12% at present.
Thursday 27 August 2015
- Research and Development direction
A quick reconnaissance survey of the coffee sector in Togo was conducted from 20 – 23 august 2012. The main objectives were: 1. To assess the status of coffee production and the system of production in Togo, 2. To identify major constraints of coffee production and measures to be taken to address the constraints, and 3. To understand the agro-ecological diversity of the coffee growing areas in Togo for consideration in quality profile mapping project. To achieve these objectives: (a) discussions were held with relevant authorizes in the coffee sector and (2) field visits were made to discuss with the farmers to observe the realities on the ground under farm conditions and collect first hand information. Coffee Stakeholders Visited: 1. Coffee and Cocoa Sector Coordinating Committee (CCFCC) 2. Agronomic Research Institute of Togo (ITRA) 3. Institute of Technical Council and Support (ICAT) 4. Coffee Quality Control Authority (DCMC) 5. Private Coffee ware houses owned by Indian, OLAM and OASIS companies in Lome and Kpalime 6. Coffee and Cocoa Technical Unit (UTCC) 7. Coffee and Cocoa Research Center (CRAF) 8. Federation of the Unions of Coffee and Cocoa Producers of Togo (FUPROCAT)
Wednesday 26 August 2015
- Research and Development direction
Coffee is an important agricultural commodity, second only to oil in the international trade. About 25 million families supporting over 125 million people in more than 50 developing countries of Africa, Latin America and Asia that produce and sell coffee depend on it as their main source of income. In Africa, about 33 million people directly depend on coffee for their livelihoods and it is the pillar of the national economy contributing over 10% to the export earnings of some 14 African countries. Globally, coffee generates over US$12.44 billion annually to the coffee producing and exporting countries, with a retail values of about US$70 billion. In the 1970s and 1980s, the market share of Africa was about 30% and this has steadily dropped down to about 12% today. From this figures, one can easily estimate how much foreign earnings Africa is annually losing because of the decline of coffee production and export in the region. Ghana is one of the big losers as its annual production has gone down as low as 600 tons despite the enormous potential that the country owes for coffee production.

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